Autocar Mondays – 1942 M3 Half Track

Photos arrived today from the western front today, otherwise known as Stafford, New York of this 1942 Autocar M3 Half Track. The M3 was produced by all the truck divisions of the White Motor Company including Autocar and Diamond-T. The M3 saw action in nearly every theater of World War II and was used extensively by all Allied forces.

Powered by a White six cylinder gas engine matted to a 4 speed the M3 could carry up to 13 soldiers and their gear. Protection from enemy fire was made possible by 1/4 inch armor plate on sides and rear along with a 1/2 thick windshield plate. Top speed of the half-track was rated at 40 mph.

Nearly 41,000 M3 were built during war time by White and IHC (the M-5) which lead to an extensive long life for the machines during the next three decades. This particular truck was one of 16 units procured from Italy at the end of the war by Dewitt, Inc for use in building projects back in the United States that included the Mt. Morris dam and the New York Thruway.

It’s hard to believe how many of these truck were built back in the day yet exist in such small numbers now. A big thank you to Andy for sharing these photos.

Do you have an Autocar you would like to see featured on Autocar Mondays? Email eric@dailydieseldose.com today! 

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2 Responses to Autocar Mondays – 1942 M3 Half Track

  1. econobiker says:

    “This particular truck was one of 16 units procured from Italy at the end of the war by Dewitt, Inc for use in building projects back in the United States that included the Mt. Morris dam and the New York Thruway.”
    In this modern era of super huge purpose built heavy duty construction trucks we forget how many of these war veteran half tracks were used in construction because they were cheap, plentiful, and available post-ware when commercial trucks and construction equipment were still “small”.
    I even remember seeing a half track painted yellow and made into a flat bed in the early to mid 1980s still at a demolition/construction site at the NJ shore.

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