Goodbye Maxxforce

The writing has been on the wall for a while now but now it’s become official without being officially announced, the Maxxforce lines of engines produced by International are a failure. At least the larger bore models for class 8 semis. The debacle with Maxxforce EGR engines has costed the company millions while decreasing market share. Thanks to the wise decision to dump EGR and partner with Cummins, International has managed to claw it’s way back to profitably through plant closures and other divestitures. But yet the pain still lingers. Maxxforce engines were supposed to free International from the hassles of dealing with outside suppliers. Building engines in house make sense as the profits stay in house. If you make your own engines you are not at the mercy of an outside vendor who can idle your production lines when they experience problems of their own. This integrated production should allow you to move trucks out the door at a quick pace. With industry backlog at record highs this could lead to an increase in market share. After all, your competitors cant sell a truck they don’t have. Unfortunately for International this wasn’t the case. Warranty costs relating to Maxxforce EGR spiraled while reliability plummeted. Class action lawsuits are now starting. In the trucking word people rarely forget or forgive trucks that don’t perform. Once you lose a customer you have to work very hard to get them back. So what do you do? Time for a rebranding.

I’ve noticed recently on the International website, the Trail Magazine, and the International Youtube channel news regarding the N9 and N10 line of engines. These two “new” engines appear to have replaced all the Maxxforce engines except for the DT and 7 creations. Are they really new? No, they are not. Based on the video below I think they are the same Maxxforce engines as before but this time using SCR from the factory. The International rep in the video alludes to past glories of class leading engines and the need to regain that title while mentioning the N series line are the best of both worlds as they use EGR hardened materials that can only lead to increase life in less demanding SCR situations. We shall see. Unlike when Maxxforce arrived on the scene the N’s arrived with no trumpets blaring. No banners unfurling. No outrages promises have been made. The engines have quietly arrived on the scene hopefully ready to work.

As an unabashed International supporter I hope they can pull this off. I would probably feel different if I was one of the people stuck with a Maxxforce lump but I wasn’t so I’m willing to forgive and forget. Below is a video of engine manufacturing relating to the new N9 and N10.

Personally, I’m happy to see the Maxxforce name leave us. It reminded me to much of the time Homer Simpson changed his name to Max Power, a name he mooched from a hair dryer of all places.

This entry was posted in Industry News and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

11 Responses to Goodbye Maxxforce

  1. Jim says:

    If I remember correctly, International had the same problems when they introduced the V800 engine back in the 1970s. By all accounts that I’ve heard, the V800 was a real boat anchor!

  2. Brunno One says:

    So my beloved (I really hate it) MAXXFORCE 9 will now be “re-born” and known as the “N-9”, only that now it won’t be CHOKED on its own exhaust gas (“Advanced” EGR)

    ¿Will Cummins be the supplier of SCR Systems? Oh, these have their tons of issues too.

    Not to mention the poor craftsmanship Navistar puts on the assebly of their trucks.

    DT-Series where their last good engines.

    Now I call them:
    NAVITRASH
    JUNKERNATIONAL
    WORSTSTAR
    LACKSFORCE

    I”ll be happy if they are OUT OF BUSINESS

  3. Brunno One says:

    INTERNATIONAL V8 are JUNK

    9.0
    T444E
    VT365

    • Hank says:

      I have 2 T444E’s and they do the job. Yeah sure they are under powered and slow but they do the job well and reliably. They both are fairly low mileage at 200000 miles but they both seem like they will have long lives ahead of them.

      Im not sure why every one dislikes them.

      • Eric says:

        The larger bore engines, typically found in the class 8 OTR trucks had many problems. The smaller liter engines like yours behaved much better.

  4. David says:

    Well guys don’t believe the hipe of the new motors. I bought a 2015 with the N9 (maxforce 10) The truck was a test truck for international and they ran it night and day until it got to 217k. They dropped a brand new crate engine into it (not rebuilt) and sent the old one back for a tear down for inspection. I bought the truck for 60k thinking it has a new engine?? Warranty from international is 2 year or 250k from the inservice date. It now has 307k and the egr cooler leaked over night into cylinder number 6. When I cranked the motor it hydrolocked and now needs a inframe for 14k plus more if there’s head damage, plus more If the injectors got coolant into them, plus more if the dpf filers got coolant into it. So long story short it can cost up to $25,000. International don’t want to help either?? All I can say is SAY AWAY!!! This truck is a 2015 with cummins help with the dpf system. Now I’m forced running my 1.5million truck over the road because the garbage can died

    • David says:

      By the way the new motor only has 90k miles… international says the only way to stop this problem is to check the coolant everytime you start and stop the motor. All fluids were full in Phoenix and lost the motor in Bakersfield. STAY AWAY!!

    • John says:

      David,
      We have 10 MaxxForce DT engines in our fleet and 3 of them needed inframes because #6 had zero compression caused by the leaking EGR cooler contaminating the engine oil and obviously washing down the oil on the cylinder sleeve but why just #6?

      This was the exact same failure on all 3 engines. I’m wondering why or how the coolant is getting to #6 cylinder? We do engine oil samples and now when they come back with coolant in the oil we change the EGR cooler right away. It’s a big expensive pain in the butt. One of the 3 engines was covered under warranty but the other 2 are on us for around $15,000.00

  5. Mike Perez says:

    The state dot owns several internationals with maxforce engines and they have proven to be junks. Perfect example we have a 09 international with the maxforce engine and already we’ve had to replace the ITVP (intake throttle position sensor because it went into limp mode and it wouldn’t allow to regen or force regen using a laptop so I replaced the the throttle valve and performed a regen process and that was successful and all warning lights on dash clear and the truck ran very well for about 2 days now it’s back and running like hell and the ECM flashe a dtc for VGT performance fault and a dtc for cylinder no.1 balance max limit exceeded and it’s sputtering through the turbo charge return hose and mind you this truck has only 39000 miles 3800 hours so you tell what think?

  6. Phillip says:

    Can someone give me some advise abt the
    Maxxforce GDT310 9.3 310 HP Engine.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *